Signs of Holiness in Today’s World By Pope Francis, in “Gaudete et Exultate” (Rejoice and Be Glad)

Fr. Edlefsen's Sunday Column
August 30, 2018
Signs Of Holiness In Todays World

Within the framework of holiness offered by the Beatitudes and Matthew 25:31-46, I would like to mention a few signs or spiritual attitudes that, in my opinion, are necessary if we are to understand the way of life to which the Lord calls us.  I will not pause to explain the means of sanctification already known to us: the various methods of prayer, the inestimable sacraments of the Eucharist and Reconciliation, the offering of personal sacrifices, different forms of devotion, spiritual direction, and many others as well.  Here I will speak only of certain aspects of the call to holiness that I hope will prove especially meaningful.

The signs I wish to highlight are not the sum total of a model of holiness, but they are five great expressions of love for God and neighbor that I consider of particular importance in the light of certain dangers and limitations present in today’s culture.  There we see a sense of anxiety, sometimes violent, that distracts and debilitates; negativity and sullenness; the self-content bred by consumerism; individualism; and all those forms of ersatz spirituality – having nothing to do with God – that dominate the current religious marketplace.

PERSEVERANCE, PATIENCE AND MEEKNESS

The first of these great signs is solid grounding in the God who loves and sustains us.  This source of inner strength enables us to persevere amid life’s ups and downs, but also to endure hostility, betrayal and failings on the part of others.  “If God is for us, who is against us?” (Romans 8:31): this is the source of the peace found in the saints.  Such inner strength makes it possible for us, in our fast-paced, noisy and aggressive world, to give a witness of holiness through patience and constancy in doing good.  It is a sign of the fidelity born of love, for those who put their faith in God (pístis) can also be faithful to others (pistós).  They do not desert others in bad times; they accompany them in their anxiety and distress, even though doing so may not bring immediate satisfaction.

Saint Paul bade the Romans not to repay evil for evil (Romans 12:17), not to seek revenge (v. 19), and not to be overcome by evil, but instead to “overcome evil with good” (v. 21).  This attitude is not a sign of weakness but of true strength, because God himself “is slow to anger but great in power” (Nah 1:3).  The word of God exhorts us to “put away all bitterness and wrath and wrangling and slander, together with all malice” (Ephesians 4:31).

We need to recognize and combat our aggressive and selfish inclinations, and not let them take root. “Be angry but do not sin; do not let the sun go down on your anger” (Ephesians 4:26).  When we feel overwhelmed, we can always cling to the anchor of prayer, which puts us back in God’s hands and the source of our peace.  “Have no anxiety about anything, but in everything, by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God.  And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts...” (Philippians 4:6-7).

Christians too can be caught up in networks of verbal violence through the internet and the various forums of digital communication.  Even in Catholic media, limits can be overstepped, defamation and slander can become commonplace, and all ethical standards and respect for the good name of others can be abandoned.  The result is a dangerous dichotomy, since things can be said there that would be unacceptable in public discourse, and people look to compensate for their own discontent by lashing out at others.  It is striking that at times, in claiming to uphold the other commandments, they completely ignore the eighth, which forbids bearing false witness or lying, and ruthlessly vilify others.  Here we see how the unguarded tongue, set on fire by hell, sets all things ablaze (James 3:6).

Inner strength, as the work of grace, prevents us from becoming carried away by the violence that is so much a part of life today, because grace defuses vanity and makes possible meekness of heart.  The saints do not waste energy complaining about the failings of others; they can hold their tongue before the faults of their brothers and sisters, and avoid the verbal violence that demeans and mistreats others.  Saints hesitate to treat others harshly; they consider others better than themselves (Philippians 2:3).

It is not good when we look down on others like heartless judges, lording it over them and always trying to teach them lessons.  That is itself a subtle form of violence.  Saint John of the Cross proposed a different path: “Always prefer to be taught by all, rather than to desire teaching even the least of all.”  And he added advice on how to keep the devil at bay: “Rejoice in the good of others as if it were your own, and desire that they be given precedence over you in all things; this you should do wholeheartedly.  You will thereby overcome evil with good, banish the devil, and possess a happy heart.  Try to practice this all the more with those who least attract you.  Realize that if you do not train yourself in this way, you will not attain real charity or make any progress in it.”

Humility can only take root in the heart through humiliations.  Without them, there is no humility or holiness.  If you are unable to suffer and offer up a few humiliations, you are not humble and you are not on the path to holiness.  The holiness that God bestows on his Church comes through the humiliation of his Son.  He is the way. Humiliation makes you resemble Jesus; it is an unavoidable aspect of the imitation of Christ.  For “Christ suffered for you, leaving you an example, so that you might follow in his steps” (1 Peter 2:21).  In turn, he reveals the humility of the Father, who condescends to journey with his people, enduring their infidelities and complaints (Exodus 34:6-9; Wisdom 11:23-12:2; Luke 6:36).  For this reason, the Apostles, after suffering humiliation, rejoiced “that they were counted worthy to suffer dishonor for [Jesus’] name” (Acts 5:41).

Here I am not speaking only about stark situations of martyrdom, but about the daily humiliations of those who keep silent to save their families, who prefer to praise others rather than boast about themselves, or who choose the less welcome tasks, at times even choosing to bear an injustice so as to offer it to the Lord.  “If when you do right and suffer for it, you have God’s approval” (1 Peter 2:20).  This does not mean walking around with eyes lowered, not saying a word and fleeing the company of others.  At times, precisely because someone is free of selfishness, he or she can dare to disagree gently, to demand justice or to defend the weak before the powerful, even if it may harm his or her reputation.

I am not saying that such humiliation is pleasant, for that would be masochism, but that it is a way of imitating Jesus and growing in union with him.  This is incomprehensible on a purely natural level, and the world mocks any such notion. Instead, it is a grace to be sought in prayer: “Lord, when humiliations come, help me to know that I am following in your footsteps.”

To act in this way presumes a heart set at  peace by Christ, freed from the aggressiveness born of overweening egotism.  That same peacefulness, the fruit of grace, makes it possible to preserve our inner trust and persevere in goodness, “though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death” (Psalm 23:4) or “a host encamp against me” (Psalm 27:3).  Standing firm in the Lord, the Rock, we can sing: “In peace I will both lie down and sleep; for you alone, O Lord, make me dwell in safety” (Psalm 4:8).  Christ, in a word, “is our peace” (Ephesians 2:14); he came “to guide our feet into the way of peace” (Luke 1:79).  As he told Saint Faustina Kowalska, “Mankind will not have peace until it turns with trust to my mercy.”  So let us not fall into the temptation of looking for security in success, vain pleasures, possessions, power over others or social status.  Jesus says: “My peace I give to you; I do not give it to you as the world gives peace” (John 14:27).

 

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